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Current Research

 

Exploring and enhancing data breach reporting behaviour within governmental organisations

Acronym

Exploring and enhancing data breach reporting behaviour

Time schedule

2019-2024

Researchers

Sander Ebbers MSc (PhD-candidate, Prof. dr. Wouter Stol, dr. Jurjen Jansen

Contact

sander.ebbers@nhlstenden.com

Main research question

Which organisational factors facilitate or inhibit data breach reporting behaviour and how can these factors effectively be intervened?

Summary

From an organisational perspective there is, as far as we know, no empirical research on determinants of data breach reporting of employees. The objective of this PhD research is twofold. First, the research aims to contribute to the scientific literature through applying empirical research on data breach reporting behaviour in an organisational context, which is a first of its kind. Second, the research aims to give insights to organisations on how to influence data breach reporting behaviour within the organisational context.

 

 

Impact of cybercrime victimization (Slachtofferimpact Cybercrime)

Acronym

SICC

Time schedule

December 2018 – December 2022

Researchers

Jildau Borwell MSc (PhD candidate), Prof. Dr. Wouter Stol; Dr. Jurjen Jansen

Students involved

-

Contact

jildau.borwell@nhlstenden.com

Main research question

What is the impact of cybercrime victimization compared to traditional crime, and what does this mean for the role of the police?

Summary

Victims of crime can experience serious and long-lasting consequences of the offence they encountered. However, while society and the techniques criminals use are digitizing, the victimization impact of cybercrime remains largely unclear. Moreover, a comprehensive comparison between the impact of cybercrime and traditional crime has not been made.

The current study compares the impact of cybercrime on individual victims to the impact of traditional crime. To that goal, suitable groups of cybercrime and traditional crime are established. Also, suitable measurement methods and theoretical models are explored. Victimization impact is divided in emotional/psychological, material/financial, physical/bodily, and social/behavioral impact. The implications of the results for the role of the police in victim care and crime response will also be examined.

 

Police Detectives on the TOR Network

Acronym

PDTOR

Time schedule

2017-2020

Researchers

Bram Emmen MSc (PhD-candidate), Prof. dr. Wouter Stol, Prof. dr. Christianne de Poot

Contact

Bram.Emmen@ou.nl

Main research question

The main research question is if and why there is a difference between everyday police practice and how the work should be done according to principles of forensic correctness and legal fairness.

Summary

The present study focuses on police detectives fighting crime on a specific part of the internet: the TOR-network. The core idea is to compare everyday police reality with the demands that are imposed on detective work by principles of both forensic correctness and legal fairness. ‘Forensic correctness’ refers to collecting information in accordance with technological and jurisprudential requirements imposed on law enforcement. ‘Legal fairness’ refers to the police doing their work in accordance with the rule of law and fundamental human rights. The results can help the police to fight crime in modern society appropriately. The results can also help those to whom the police are accountable as well as provide the academic world with new and up-to-date arguments in the ongoing discussion about technology-based policing, fundamental human rights and how the law can be enforced in this newly created digital environment. The study is set up as an international comparative study. Detective work on the TOR-network will be studied in Norway, the Netherlands and the United Kingdom. The forensic analysis will be carried out in Sweden.

Funding

Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO) in cooperation with NordForsk (The Nordic Countries’ Organisation for Scientific Research)

 

Youth with a Mild Intellectual Disability and Cybersafety

Time schedule

2016-2020

Researchers

Rogier de Groot MSc (PhD-candidate), Dr. Hendrien Kaal, Prof. dr. Wouter Stol

Contact

groot.de.r@hsleiden.nl

Main research question

Which experiences (victimization and offending) do adolescents in the age between 12-19 with MID have on the online risk areas aggression, financial-economic crime, sexual activities, and beliefs?
Which risk and protective factors explain why this population have experiences in these risk areas?
How does knowledge on these experiences and their explanations contribute to the delivery of health care services? 

Summary

Adolescents pose a safety risk in using the internet, like cyberbullying and identity fraude. Adolescents with a mild intellectual disability (MID) seem to be more prone to these risks than average adolescents which can result in victimization and offending behavior. So far little attention has been paid to the online problems of adolescents with MID. Therefore, the aim of this research is to explore the online (risk) behavior of adolescents with MID and to identify important risk and protective factors in order to contribute to the delivery of healthcare services in the Netherlands. 

Funding

Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO)

 

 

Upcoming research

 

 Police patrol work and the use of information technology

Acronym

 Police patrol work and the use of information technology

Time schedule

2020-2021

Researchers

Prof. dr. Wouter Stol (NHL Stenden / Police Academy / Open University), dr. Litska Strikwerda (Open University), dr. Wendy Schreurs (Police Academy)

Students involved (from)

none to date

Contact

wouter.stol@nhlstenden.com

Main research question

How does the use of digital information by police officers affect police patrol work?

Summary

Police patrol work will be observed (by systematic social observation) in three basic teams of the Dutch police (in the cities of Amsterdam, Groningen and Wageningen). This will result in a picture of contemporary police patrol work and information use. The main question is how digital information (from the police or others) is being used by police officers and with what result. The situation of 2020-2021 will be compared with the situation in 2003-2005 and in 1991-1995, when the same method was used in the same cities.

Due to the corona crisis the study might be altered.

Funding

Politie & Wetenschap (Police & Science Foundation)